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Being in Charge

28 Jan

Okay, I admit it.  I like being in charge. 

I’ve also been known to assert my authority once in awhile.  

“I’ll be the teacher, you be ‘Joey’.” 

This is my subtle reminder to those not so subtle children who make a habit of correcting others, and in the process annoying those children that they are attempting to correct.  

Usually it works.  

Usually.

Until I had  a particularly bright child who finally decided to let me be in charge and finally allowed me to correct the children, but still felt the need to inform me of the many wrong doings that I was so obviously missing.

“Teacher Boss, Teacher Boss!  She is budging in line”

“Teacher Boss, Teacher Boss…”

Maybe I should’ve been insulted.  Instead I laughed. 

Hey, if the name fits…

I think that it fits quite well, actually. 

Only a Teacher Boss would use the line “Hey, don’t make me use my bossy voice” to a group of slightly out of control children to grab their attention, and have the children respond by sitting and listening.

A Teacher Boss knows when to use her bossy voice, and she can use it well.

I am Teacher Boss

I am in charge.

So don’t make me use my bossy voice. 

Mrs. V

The words in my brain

27 Mar

All day long my brain is filled with little snippets of ideas that I want to write about.  These thoughts flow in and out as quickly as I breathe.

If I were organized, I would write those bits and pieces down the moment they popped into my brain.  Then if I had the time, I would expand on those thoughts and write and write until the thought was an actual post.

Some people start rough drafts on their blogs and save them.  Not me.  I only write when I finally have a complete thought and the time to put it into the computer. 

I’ve always worked that way.

Even when I teach.

I always have an outline of what I want to teach and then I go with the flow.  I make up a poem or a song on the spot so that it fits the lesson that I am trying to teach.  All because of the words that float around in my brain.

I live in the moment, I guess.

At least I like to believe that I do.   Most people would say I save things for the last minute.

I do that too.

I have a lot of words I want to share, I just need to get them organized and put into complete thoughts.

Instead of waiting until the last minute.

Mrs. V

Small steps

14 Feb

The small steps of progress by the children in my classroom often bring me the greatest joy.  

~The child who has written the last letter of his/her name backward suddenly has it going the right direction.

~The child who cannot write his/her name, starts writing the first letter of that name on each piece of artwork.

~The child who asks me how to draw a person, and then draws his/her own person for the very first time.

~The child who has learned to zip his/her coat and chooses to share his/her enthusiasm with us.

~The children painting with letter shaped cookie cutters purposefully turning the cookie cutters so that the letters face the correct direction.

~The children who have avoided the art and writing tables because of fine motor difficulties are beginning to try the activities.

~The child who shows me that he/she knows how to read and/or write a few words that we’ve talked about in class.

~The child who comforts a classmate who is sad or hurt.

~The child who shares because he/she wants to, not because he/she was told to.

~The child who finishes the floor jigsaw puzzle by his/herself.

~The child who self-corrects and tries again while completing an activity, using a skill learned in class.

~The children who weren’t ready to talk to me are beginning to share a thought or two, a smile, and a small connection.

~The child who makes a gift for someone because he/she knows it will make that someone smile.

We are halfway through our preschool year and their small steps will walk us through the rest of our days together, when they’ll take the huge leap into kindergarten.  With each group of children I teach, I am always amazed by how much they learn and grow during the year they are at our preschool.

I “don’t sweat the small stuff.”  I rejoice in it.

Mrs. V

Transitions

28 Jan

How do you transition?

Do you scream?  Do you yell?

Do you stomp off and cry?

Do you do what you’re told and don’t ask why?

Do you even try?

Do you come when you’re called?  Or do you hide?

Do you say something snide?

Do you keep it all bottled up inside?

Are  you helpful?  Are you thoughtful?

Are you mean or quite possibly awful?

Are you mad?  Are you sad?

Or does this all make you glad?

Are you bad?

Do you stop and think?  Or stare and blink?

Or is your excitement just on the brink?

Do you smile? 

Or do you frown for a while?

Do you cross your arms and glare with style?

Do you anticipate what’s coming up?

Or maybe you just want to give up?

Do you kick?  Do you hit?

Do you throw a fit?

Do you sit?

It’s a hard job as you can see,

To conduct the Preschool Transitioning Melody.

Mrs. V

Do People Realize…

22 Sep

Floor is Lava[1]

…that preschoolers thought of this game first?

When we have our large motor play equipment out in our big room, such as our climber, balance beam or  bouncy bridge, the floor beneath the equipment becomes lava. 

Every year I watch preschoolers play this game, and  every year I am quite amused by their imagination. 

Where do they learn these things?  Did someone teach them this game?  Did they hear it and see it on a playground?  Did they figure it out for themselves?  The questions remain unanswered.

It just takes one child to mention it, and several will follow that child’s lead.

The lava is already flowing in our classroom. 

I better watch my feet.

Mrs. V